Category: Spending

February Update//Movin’ On Up and Random Shout Outs

Well that graph is finally looking better. Our numbers were buoyed by a combination of a big spending reduction as compared to last February and a continued run on stocks sending our asset values on a continued upward trajectory. Last month our assets increased by 3.45%. Simultaneously, our annual expenses dropped by 4.3%. Add it […]

Are We Financially Independent?//Breaking Down the Budget

In our last post, we shared that our annual spending was up approximately $10,000 compared to the previous year. We are pretty anti-budget, and we appreciate having the ability to be flexible with our spending. However, we are even more anti-being ignorant of important stuff. I think knowing where our cash is flowing qualifies. Our […]

November Update

Slow and Steady The chart is trending up for a second consecutive month.  The markets were a mixed bag with domestic equities up a bit while bonds and international funds fell.  We continue to plow in large contributions pushing our asset values up a respectable 1.36% for the month.  Overall our assets as a multiple of […]

A Non-Expert’s Guide to Early Retirement

Recently, I clicked on the internet to check my e-mail, but was immediately distracted.  I saw a headline on the MSN homepage with the title:   “Want to Retire in Your 40’s?  It’s not impossible”. I LOVE to see the financial independence/early retirement idea get publicity, planting the seed that this is a real possibility into the minds of […]

July Update

A Small Step Backward This month we saw a drop in our investment value. At the same time our rolling monthly spending average went up by nearly $80.  This took our investments from 17.97 times our expenses down to 17.54. Unfortunately, next month doesn’t look a whole lot better.  While we never try to predict the market, […]

Your Attitude is More Important Than Your Paycheck

After my recent interview on the Dough Roller Podcast, a listener named Jim left this comment: “I do not wish to diminish the success of your guest, because they have done what few are willing to do. Yet, anyone that makes $180k a year can well afford a high savings rate. Yes, they saved in […]

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